Dimensions Of The Mind

Phil 4:8 “Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things” (NIV).
As I mentioned before, two of the main functions of the mind are the ability to remember and imagine. We will now consider the imagination dimension. After studying about the imagination, I am still fascinated that various dictionaries make a connection between the following words: imagination, creative power, vision and inspiration. Could this mean that creative power, vision, and inspiration are linked to what we are imagining?Think of your brain not just as an organ for thinking, but as a radio receiver that picks up different stations (according to what the radio receiver is tuned for). For most of my life, my brain was tuned into the enemy station. I constantly heard an inner voice telling me I was inadequate, unimportant, and unlovable. My imagination built pictures of apparent proof that these thoughts were true. Eventually, thoughts that we continually tune into will become our own beliefs - not just passing thoughts.Just as we question which thoughts are of God and which are our own, we should consider whether thoughts are the enemy’s or ours. More importantly, we should be thinking on purpose as Philippians 4:8 says, rather than being victims of the “airwaves.” To think on purpose means that I am not just playing defense (rejecting negative thoughts), but that I am actually on offense (purposely deciding what I want to think about). The ability to remember and imagine was created by God to enable us to prosper; therefore, we need to intentionally use these gifts in a healthy way, designed by God.
Many times we do the opposite of Philippians 4:8. We meditate on our failures and things that are wrong, or think on things that inspire us into hopelessness or pain. I discovered that when a passing thought becomes a focus in my mind, my imagination will build a picture (framework) for that thought. Then I discovered that my brain was like a muscle that could be trained to hold certain thoughts and reject others. This truth helped me to understand that I was not a victim to my thoughts. In fact, it brought hope because I discovered that through Godly meditation, I could change the way I think. Think of your brain not just as an organ for thinking, but as a radio receiver that picks up different stations (according to what the radio receiver is tuned for). For most of my life, my brain was tuned into the enemy station. I constantly heard an inner voice telling me I was inadequate, unimportant, and unlovable. My imagination built pictures of apparent proof that these thoughts were true. Eventually, thoughts that we continually tune into will become our own beliefs - not just passing thoughts.Just as we question which thoughts are of God and which are our own, we should consider whether thoughts are the enemy’s or ours. More importantly, we should be thinking on purpose as Philippians 4:8 says, rather than being victims of the “airwaves.” To think on purpose means that I am not just playing defense (rejecting negative thoughts), but that I am actually on offense (purposely deciding what I want to think about).The ability to remember and imagine was created by God to enable us to prosper; therefore, we need to intentionally use these gifts in a healthy way, designed by God.